How to Tie a Hanover Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 20-09-2012

The Hanover Knot is a large and symmetrical tie knot. The Hanover Knot is only a little larger from the known Windsor knot, however forms a different, more bulky tie knot appearance. Unlike the Windsor knot, the Hanover knot starts the tying from an upside-down starting position of the necktie (causing the narrow end underneath the necktie to show its back side when exceeding it). The Hanover is considered a popular knot and used by many, and definitely worth a try. The Hanover will be perfect for too thin too long neckties, due to its large knot. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a Grantchester Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 17-09-2012

The Grantchester Knot is a large in thick, slightly asymmetrical tie knot. It is a larger version of the St. Andrew knot, by extra 360° around the narrow end. Just like the St.Andrew knot, the Grantchester knot is tied from an upside-down starting position of the necktie. Due to the multiple steps of the tying, the Grantchester knot forms a bulky knot and uses a large length of the tie, therefore will suit a thin fabric materials or too long neckties, or just where a bulky knot is desired. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie an Atlantic Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 11-09-2012

The Atlantic Knot is a unique, unusual tie knot that differs from all other common tie knots. The Atlantic Knot is a reversed version of the Pratt Knot, therefore results in an opposite knot, that shows the knot structure which is usually hidden at the back. This tying method also differs from other tying methods by its being tied by moving the narrow end, and not the wide end, as in all other tying methods. The Atlantic knot forms a very unique and exotic look, which will stand out among other, ‘regular’ tying methods. The Atlantic knot is considered a relatively difficult to tie knot, and requires some practice to get it look good. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a St. Andrew Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 09-09-2012

The St. Andrew Knot is a medium-large in thick tying method that is similar in its look to the half-windsor knot. The St. Andrew knot is slightly asymmetrical and forms a little thicker knot than the half-Windsor (yet thinner than the full Windsor). This tying method is tied starting with the necktie upside-down. The St. Andrew Knot is considered a relatively easy to form knot that looks good even for beginners. It will be a good choice where a thick, slightly asymmetrical look is wanted. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a Cavendish Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 06-09-2012

The Cavendish Knot is a relatively large and thick tying method. It is similar in its thickness to the Windsor knot, and differs by its being slightly asymmetrical and less triangular (like a combination between the half-Windsor look with the thickness of the full Windsor). The Cavendish tying method will be a good choice for too long too thin neckties. The advantage of this tying method, unlike other bulky tying methods, is for its being tied from the regular starting position (not upside-down, like the Balthus knot), which is great news for those who don’t like the look of the inverted narrow end of the necktie when it excesses the front part of the necktie. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a Plattsburgh Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 04-09-2012

The Plattsburgh Knot is a large and thick tying method, named after the small city “Plattsburgh”, in New York, where its inventor Thomas Fink was born. The Plattsburgh tying method is a bit shorten variant of the longest tying method: the Balthus Knot (skipping step 6), but still one of longest tying methods. The Plattsburgh method forms a large, triangular and symmetric tie knot, and will use a relatively long part of the necktie. The best choice for thin fabric, long neckties when the balthus knot is just too much. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a Kelvin Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 03-09-2012

The Kelvin Knot is a another variant to the popular Four in hand tying method. The Kelvin tying method is tied with the necktie upside-down (like the Pratt knot), and is slightly thicker than the four in hand, only by an extra of 1/2 loop. The extra half spin also contributes to a more symmetrical look of the tie. The kelvin knot tying method will be perfect for cases when only a little thicker knot is needed, but still preserving the same famous look. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a Victoria Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 29-08-2012

The Victoria Knot is a semi-popular tying method that is very similar to the popular Four-In-Hand tying method. The only difference between the two is the extra 2 steps in the middle of the tying (steps 5-6, one more loop around the narrow end), which probably is the reason for this tying method to become less popular. However, due to the extra 2 steps, the Victoria knot results in a bit fuller, larger tie knot, and uses a little more length of the tie, which will become an advantage when using thin or long neckties, while still preserving the same Four In Hand knot look. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a Nicky Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 26-08-2012

The Nicky knot is a self-released variant of the known Pratt knot tying method. Just like the Pratt knot,the Nicky tying method necktie starting position is upside-down. The advantage of this method over the Pratt knot is that it is self-released – meaning you could take off your tie just by pulling the knot down. The Nicky knot forms a symmetrical, medium thick knot, and uses low-medium length of the necktie. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a Balthus Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 25-08-2012

The Balthus knot is the largest tying method among the common named tying methods, and forms a bulky and thick knot. It will best suite people who love the large knot look for their necktie. This tying methods will also be perfect for ties made from a very thin fabric which causes a small tie knot, it will also will be a good match for too long in length ties, as the large knot and many steps will reduce the length of the tie. The Balthus knot tying method starting position, unlike the major tying methods, is upside down (the back side on top). Read the rest of this entry »

How to Tie a Small Knot

Posted by admin in More Tying Methods on 17-08-2012

The Small Knot (Also known as the Oriental Knot or the Kent knot) is known as the simplest tying method, even more than the popular Four In Hand. This tying method is less popular than the major tying methods, mainly because it is not self-released, the upside down starting position (that leads the narrow end of the tie to be shown opposite in a case it exceed below the side end), and the very small knot created which is often too small. However, the small method is a great method to use on a very thick tie, or a short one, when other tying methods will make it too short. And also is very easy to remember. Read the rest of this entry »